Abruptio placentae from abdominal massage in a tertiary hospital in South-South, Nigeria: A case series.

Oriji PC1, Allagoa DO1, Omietimi JE1, Obagah L1, Orisabinone IB1, Tekenah ES1
1Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Federal Medical Centre, Yenagoa, Bayelsa State, Nigeria.
Correspondence: Dr. Oriji, Peter Chibuzor; +234 706 423 3209; chibuzor54@gmail.com

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Abstract

Background: Abdominal massage has been practised for a long time by obstetric and non-obstetric patients in various parts of the world, especially in the South-South region of Nigeria. The major reason the obstetric patients go for abdominal massage in this region is because it is the usual cultural practice of pregnant women.
Case Presentation:
The first patient was a 19-year-old unbooked G2 P0+1 who presented with complaints of abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding, both of 4-hour duration at 30 weeks and 5 days’ gestational age. Her complaints followed abdominal massage. She was diagnosed of Abruptio placentae with live baby, and subsequently had emergency Caesarean section. She was discharged on the 5th day post operation, while her baby was discharged three weeks later from the special care baby unit.
The second patient was a 28-year-old unbooked G3 P2+0 who presented with complaints of moderate abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding, both of 3-hour duration at 37 weeks and 2 days’ gestational age. Her complaints also followed abdominal massage. She was diagnosed of Abruptio placentae with live baby, and subsequently had emergency Caesarean section. She was discharged on the 5th day post operation, and went home with her baby.
The third patient was a 36-year-old booked G4 P0+3 who presented with complaints of abdominal pain and vaginal bleeding, both of 8-hour duration at 38 weeks’ gestational age. Her complaints followed abdominal massage just like the two other patients. She was diagnosed of Abruptio placentae with dead baby, and had instrumental vaginal delivery with the use of vacuum extraction. She was discharged home on the 2nd day postpartum.
Conclusion: Abdominal massage has contributed to increased perinatal and maternal morbidity and mortality in our subregion. All hands must be on deck to help stop this harmful traditional practice with the use of public health enlightenment campaigns, education, siting of affordable healthcare facilities close to the communities and provision of accessible roads to the healthcare facilities that are far away from the people. Improving the standard of living of the people will also help prevent them from engaging in harmful traditional practices like abdominal massage.

Keywords: Abdominal massage, Abruptio placentae, perinatal morbidity and mortality, maternal morbidity and mortality.
Yen Med J. 2020;2(3):32–35.

Cite this article: Oriji PC, Allagoa DO, Omietimi JE, Obagah L, Orisabinone IB, Tekenah ES. Abruptio placentae from abdominal massage in a tertiary hospital in South-South, Nigeria: A case series. Yen Med J. 2020;2(3):32–35.

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