Outcome of a 3-month physiotherapy intervention in a day-old baby with obstetric brachial plexus injury at Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University Teaching Hospital, Bauchi

Gbonjubola YT1*, Daha GM1, Okorocha AA1
1Department of Physiotherapy, Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University Teaching Hospital, Bauchi State, Nigeria.
*Correspondence: Dr. Gbonjubola, Yusuff Tunde; +234 8131097836; Gbonjubola4mercy@gmail.com

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Abstract

Background: Obstetric Brachial Plexus Injury (OBPI) is the most common nerve injury in children associated with significant upper extremity impairment. Foetal risk factors include breech presentation at birth and shoulder dystocia, while others include assisted delivery and poor intrapartum practices among many others. The infant with OBPI typically presents at delivery with decreased active movement of the affected upper limb and asymmetrical primitive reflex responses.
Case presentation: This case is that of a day-old male baby who was referred to physiotherapy on account of inability to move the right arm since birth. Physiotherapy was tailored towards caregiver education on patient handling, strengthening of the weak muscles, improvement of physiological properties of the muscles, prevention of secondary musculoskeletal adaptation, functional habilitation of the baby as his condition improves.
At the end of consistent 3 months of physiotherapy sessions, the outcome of the intervention revealed a significant improvement in the child’s condition with total correction of the waiter’s tip deformity and active movement of the affected upper limb although with a little residual weakness.
Conclusion: The recovery from OBPI depends on the severity of the injury and early physiotherapy intervention brings about a better prognosis.

Keywords: Brachial Plexus Injury, Waiter’s tip deformity, Toronto score, Active Movement Scale, Upper Extremity.

Cite this article: Gbonjubola YT, Daha GM, Okorocha AA. Outcome of a 3-month physiotherapy intervention in a day-old baby with obstetric brachial plexus injury at Abubakar Tafawa Balewa University Teaching Hospital, Bauchi. Yen Med J. 2021;3(4):223–225.

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